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Arduino MKR WIFI 1010 - ABX00023

:ARD02111
€28.13

The Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 is the easiest point of entry to basic IoT and pico-network application design. Whether you are looking at building a sensor network connected to your office or home router, orif you want to create a Bluetooth® Low Energy device sending data to a cellphone, the MKR WiFi 1010 is your one-stop-solution for many of the basic IoT application scenarios.

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If you have any questions on this product please feel free to contact us.

*Disclaimer: The images are merely illustrative.

The board's main processor is a low power Arm® Cortex®-M0 32-bit SAMD21, like in the other boards within the Arduino MKR family. The WiFi and Bluetooth® connectivity is performed with a module from u-blox, the NINA-W10, a low power chipset operating in the 2.4GHz range. On top of those, secure communication is ensured through the Microchip® ECC508 crypto chip. Besides that, you can find a battery charger, and a directional RGB LED on-board.

Official Arduino WiFi Library

At Arduino we have made connecting to a WiFi network as easy as getting an LED to blink. You can get your board to connect to any kind of existing WiFi network, or use it to create your own Arduino Access Point. The specific set of examples we provide for the MKR WiFi 1010 can be consulted at the WiFiNINA library reference page.

Compatible with other Cloud Services

It is also possible to connect your board to different Cloud services, Arduino's own among others. Here some examples on how to get the MKR WiFi 1010 to connect to:

  • Blynk: a simple project from our community connecting to Blynk to operate your board from a phone with little code
  • IFTTT: see an in-depth case of building a smart plug connected to IFTTT
  • AWS IoT Core: we made this example on how to connect to Amazon Web Services
  • Azure: visit this github repository explaining how to connect a temperature sensor to Azure's Cloud
  • Firebase: you want to connect to Google's Firebase, this Arduino library will show you how

Bluetooth® and Bluetooth® Low Energy

The communications chipset on the Nano 33 BLE Sense can be both a Bluetooth® Low Energy and Bluetooth® client and host device. Something pretty unique in the world of microcontroller platforms. If you want to see how easy it is to create a Bluetooth® central or a peripheral device, explore the examples at our ArduinoBLE library.

We Make it Open for you to Hack Along

The MKR WiFi 1010 is a dual processor device that invites for experimentation. Hacking the WiFiNINA module allows you to, for example, make use of both WiFi and Bluetooth® / Bluetooth® Low Energy at once on the board. Yet another possibility is having a super-lightweight version of linux running on the module, while the main microcontroller controls low level devices like motors, or screens. These experimental techniques, require advanced hacking on your side. They are possible via modifying the module's firmware that you can find at our github repositories.

BEWARE: this kind of hacking breaks the certification of your WiFiNINA module, do it at your own risk.

Battery Power

Its USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board. It has a Li-Po charging circuit that allows the Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 to run on battery power or an external 5 volt source, charging the Li-Po battery while running on external power. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically.

Related Boards

If you are looking at upgrading from previous Arduino designs, or if you are just interested in boards with similar functionality, at Arduino you can find:

  • Arduino Uno WiFi rev2: the education version of the MKR WiFi 1010, with USB-B connector and embedded accelerometer. Read more here.
  • Nano 33 IoT: if you need an even smaller form factor, this board sacrifices the battery connector, but the basic functionality is essentially the same. Visit its product page here.
  • MKR WiFi 1000: can only run WiFi applications, as it includes a different chipset than the MKR WiFi 1010. Read more about it here.

Getting Started

The Getting Started section contains all the information you need to configure your board, use the Arduino Software (IDE), and start tinkering with coding and electronics.

Tech specs

The Arduino MKR WiFi 1010 is based on the SAMD21 microcontroller.

Microcontroller SAMD21 Cortex®-M0+ 32bit low power ARM® MCU (datasheet)
Radio module u-blox NINA-W102 (datasheet)
Board Power Supply (USB/VIN) 5V
Secure Element ATECC508 (datasheet)
Supported Battery Li-Po Single Cell, 3.7V, 1024mAh Minimum
Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V
Digital I/O Pins 8
PWM Pins 13 (0 .. 8, 10, 12, 18 / A3, 19 / A4)
UART 1
SPI 1
I2C 1
Analog Input Pins 7 (ADC 8/10/12 bit)
Analog Output Pins 1 (DAC 10 bit)
External Interrupts 10 (0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,9, 16 / A1, 17 / A2)
DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA
CPU Flash Memory 256 KB (internal)
SRAM 32 KB
EEPROM no
Clock Speed 32.768 kHz (RTC), 48 MHz
LED_BUILTIN 6
USB Full-Speed USB Device and embedded Host
Length 61.5 mm
Width 25 mm
Weight 32 gr.

Documentation

EAGLE files / Schematics / Datasheet / FRITZING IN

Pinout Diagram

 Pinout-MKRwifi1010_latest.png

Additional I2C Port

The MKR WiFi 1010 has an additional connector meant as an extension of the I2C bus. It's a small form factor 5-pin connector with 1.0 mm pitch. The mechanical details of the connector can be found in the connector's datasheet.

The I2C port, also referred to as the Eslov self-identification port within Arduino, comes with: SDA, SCL, GND, +5V, and an extra digital pin meant to send an alarm to the otherwise plain I2C devices connected to it. The pinout is shown in the following image:

 Eslov_I2CPort.jpg

If you are interested in designing your own modules for Arduino boards with this expansion port, the connector we suggest using is code: SHR-05V-S-B, also in the picture.

 

ARD02111

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